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January 2022

Millions of people seek relief from plantar fasciitis every year. Plantar fasciitis is a condition that affects the plantar fascia, which is a fibrous band of tissue that attaches to the heel bone and runs along the bottom of the foot, fanning out and attaching to the long metatarsal bones in the forefoot. While walking or running the plantar fascia contracts and stretches. This repetitive pressure on the plantar fascia can cause tiny micro-tears and inflammation to develop at the site where the tissue attaches to the heel bone. Pain associated with plantar fasciitis is usually worse in the morning, when the plantar fascia is stretched suddenly after it has been in a relaxed and shortened state during sleeping hours. Podiatrists treat patients with plantar fasciitis very frequently and have developed many successful treatment protocols to reduce pain and inflammation caused by this common disorder. If you are suffering from heel pain, contact a podiatrist near you to have your condition properly diagnosed and treated.

Plantar fasciitis is a common foot condition that is often caused by a strain injury. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact one of our podiatrists from Advanced Ankle & Foot Surgeons. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common causes of heel pain. The plantar fascia is a ligament that connects your heel to the front of your foot. When this ligament becomes inflamed, plantar fasciitis is the result. If you have plantar fasciitis you will have a stabbing pain that usually occurs with your first steps in the morning. As the day progresses and you walk around more, this pain will start to disappear, but it will return after long periods of standing or sitting.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Having high arches in your feet
  • Other foot issues such as flat feet
  • Pregnancy (due to the sudden weight gain)
  • Being on your feet very often

There are some risk factors that may make you more likely to develop plantar fasciitis compared to others. The condition most commonly affects adults between the ages of 40 and 60. It also tends to affect people who are obese because the extra pounds result in extra stress being placed on the plantar fascia.

Prevention

  • Take good care of your feet – Wear shoes that have good arch support and heel cushioning.
  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • If you are a runner, alternate running with other sports that won’t cause heel pain

There are a variety of treatment options available for plantar fasciitis along with the pain that accompanies it. Additionally, physical therapy is a very important component in the treatment process. It is important that you meet with your podiatrist to determine which treatment option is best for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Belleville and O'Fallon, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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Tuesday, 18 January 2022 00:00

What Can Make Your Heel Hurt?

Heel pain is one of the most common reasons that people seek the care of a podiatrist. Because the heel is such a foundational part of the body, there are many potential reasons that your heel may hurt. Sometimes heel pain occurs as a natural consequence of aging. The fatty pad on the bottom of the heel, which provides cushioning and protection to the heels, slowly wears away with age, increasing the risk of heel pain. Various injuries, such as plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendonitis, fractures, sprains, and tarsal tunnel syndrome, can also make the heel hurt. Systemic conditions, including arthritis and peripheral neuropathy, may be to blame for your heel pain. Lifestyle factors, such as wearing ill-fitting shoes or standing or exercising excessively can contribute to heel pain as well. If you are suffering from heel pain, it is suggested that you see a podiatrist for treatment.

Many people suffer from bouts of heel pain. For more information, contact one of our podiatrists of Advanced Ankle & Foot Surgeons. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Causes of Heel Pain

Heel pain is often associated with plantar fasciitis. The plantar fascia is a band of tissues that extends along the bottom of the foot. A rip or tear in this ligament can cause inflammation of the tissue.

Achilles tendonitis is another cause of heel pain. Inflammation of the Achilles tendon will cause pain from fractures and muscle tearing. Lack of flexibility is also another symptom.

Heel spurs are another cause of pain. When the tissues of the plantar fascia undergo a great deal of stress, it can lead to ligament separation from the heel bone, causing heel spurs.

Why Might Heel Pain Occur?

  • Wearing ill-fitting shoes                  
  • Wearing non-supportive shoes
  • Weight change           
  • Excessive running

Treatments

Heel pain should be treated as soon as possible for immediate results. Keeping your feet in a stress-free environment will help. If you suffer from Achilles tendonitis or plantar fasciitis, applying ice will reduce the swelling. Stretching before an exercise like running will help the muscles. Using all these tips will help make heel pain a condition of the past.

If you have any questions please contact one of our offices located in Belleville and O'Fallon, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 11 January 2022 00:00

Plantar Warts Can Be Treated!

Plantar warts are small growths that develop on parts of the feet that bear weight. They're typically found on the bottom of the foot. Don't live with plantar warts, and call us today!

Tuesday, 11 January 2022 00:00

What Happens During an ABI Test?

An Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI) test is a fast, relatively painless, and non-invasive screening measure used to detect a person’s risk of having peripheral artery disease or other problems with blood flow in the lower limbs. During an ABI test, your doctor will use a blood pressure cuff to measure the blood pressure at various locations along your calves, feet, and toes, as well as at your upper arms. These measures are then used to calculate a ratio that corresponds to your risk of having impaired circulation. You may feel slight, momentary discomfort while your blood pressure is taken, but this test has no other risks or complications associated with it. For more information about ABI tests, please consult with a podiatrist. 

Vascular testing plays an important part in diagnosing disease like peripheral artery disease. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, or diabetes, consult with one of our podiatrists from Advanced Ankle & Foot Surgeons. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Vascular Testing?

Vascular testing checks for how well blood circulation is in the veins and arteries. This is most often done to determine and treat a patient for peripheral artery disease (PAD), stroke, and aneurysms. Podiatrists utilize vascular testing when a patient has symptoms of PAD or if they believe they might. If a patient has diabetes, a podiatrist may determine a vascular test to be prudent to check for poor blood circulation.

How Is it Conducted?

Most forms of vascular testing are non-invasive. Podiatrists will first conduct a visual inspection for any wounds, discoloration, and any abnormal signs prior to a vascular test.

 The most common tests include:

  • Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI) examination
  • Doppler examination
  • Pedal pulses

These tests are safe, painless, and easy to do. Once finished, the podiatrist can then provide a diagnosis and the best course for treatment.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Belleville and O'Fallon, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

Read more about Vascular Testing in Podiatry
Tuesday, 04 January 2022 00:00

What You Need to Know About Broken Toes

Broken toes often result from trauma. They may occur from dropping something directly on the toes, stubbing a toe, or bending them the wrong way. Toes can also break due to a stress fracture after a sudden increase in activity. The common indications of a broken toe include a snapping or popping sound at the time of the injury, swelling, bruising, and pain that becomes worse when the toe is moved. Patients who notice these symptoms may have a broken toe and would be wise to see a podiatrist who can assess the injury. A podiatrist will need to take an x-ray, and if a broken toe is confirmed, they can determine the best course for treatment. Depending on the nature of the break, the toe can be “buddy-taped” to the uninjured toe next to it, placed in a cast, or in severe cases surgery may be required.

A broken toe can be very painful and lead to complications if not properly fixed. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact one of our podiatrists from Advanced Ankle & Foot Surgeons. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What to Know About a Broken Toe

Although most people try to avoid foot trauma such as banging, stubbing, or dropping heavy objects on their feet, the unfortunate fact is that it is a common occurrence. Given the fact that toes are positioned in front of the feet, they typically sustain the brunt of such trauma. When trauma occurs to a toe, the result can be a painful break (fracture).

Symptoms of a Broken Toe

  • Throbbing pain
  • Swelling
  • Bruising on the skin and toenail
  • The inability to move the toe
  • Toe appears crooked or disfigured
  • Tingling or numbness in the toe

Generally, it is best to stay off of the injured toe with the affected foot elevated.

Severe toe fractures may be treated with a splint, cast, and in some cases, minor surgery. Due to its position and the pressure it endures with daily activity, future complications can occur if the big toe is not properly treated.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Belleville and O'Fallon, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about What to Know About a Broken Toe
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