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Tuesday, 21 September 2021 00:00

Falls are the leading cause of injury and hospitalizations in older adults across North America. Most falls occur in the home, due to slipping or stumbling. Falls can result in both minor and major injuries, from bruises and sprains to dislocations and fractures. Injuries sustained from a fall can make falling in the future more likely, as they can impair mobility and decrease an older adult’s self-confidence when it comes to getting around their home and community. There are several steps that you can take to prevent falls, including removing tripping hazards from the home, installing non-slip mats and grab bars in slippery areas, and using a mobility aid when needed. To learn more about preventing falls, please consult with a podiatrist.  

Preventing falls among the elderly is very important. If you are older and have fallen or fear that you are prone to falling, consult with one of our podiatrists from Advanced Ankle & Foot Surgeons. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality advice and care.

Every 11 seconds, an elderly American is being treated in an emergency room for a fall related injury. Falls are the leading cause of head and hip injuries for those 65 and older. Due to decreases in strength, balance, senses, and lack of awareness, elderly persons are very susceptible to falling. Thankfully, there are a number of things older persons can do to prevent falls.

How to Prevent Falls

Some effective methods that older persons can do to prevent falls include:

  • Enrolling in strength and balance exercise program to increase balance and strength
  • Periodically having your sight and hearing checked
  • Discuss any medications you have with a doctor to see if it increases the risk of falling
  • Clearing the house of falling hazards and installing devices like grab bars and railings
  • Utilizing a walker or cane
  • Wearing shoes that provide good support and cushioning
  • Talking to family members about falling and increasing awareness

Falling can be a traumatic and embarrassing experience for elderly persons; this can make them less willing to leave the house, and less willing to talk to someone about their fears of falling. Doing such things, however, will increase the likelihood of tripping or losing one’s balance. Knowing the causes of falling and how to prevent them is the best way to mitigate the risk of serious injury.  

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Belleville and O'Fallon, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 14 September 2021 00:00

The tarsal tunnel is a narrow space in the inner ankle that has nerves, blood vessels, and tendons passing through it. When the posterior tibial nerve inside of the tarsal tunnel is compressed, this leads to a painful condition called tarsal tunnel syndrome. Symptoms of this condition include foot pain, a pins and needles sensation, numbness, and swelling. The nerve compression that brings about tarsal tunnel syndrome can be caused by sports injuries, lesions, such as ganglion cysts, that occupy space in the tunnel, excess fluid buildup, changes in the biomechanics of the foot, wearing tight, ill-fitting shoes, or other medical conditions like diabetes and arthritis. In about 30% of cases, the cause is unknown. Nevertheless, tarsal tunnel syndrome can be treated and usually resolves within several weeks of treatment. If you have symptoms of this condition, please seek the care of a podiatrist. 

Tarsal tunnel syndrome can be very uncomfortable to live with. If you are experiencing tarsal tunnel syndrome, contact one of our podiatrists of Advanced Ankle & Foot Surgeons. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

Tarsal tunnel syndrome, which can also be called tibial nerve dysfunction, is an uncommon condition of misfiring peripheral nerves in the foot. The tibial nerve is the peripheral nerve in the leg responsible for sensation and movement of the foot and calf muscles. In tarsal tunnel syndrome, the tibial nerve is damaged, causing problems with movement and feeling in the foot of the affected leg.

Common Cause of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

  • Involves pressure or an injury, direct pressure on the tibial nerve for an extended period of time, sometimes caused by other body structures close by or near the knee.
  • Diseases that damage nerves, including diabetes, may cause tarsal tunnel syndrome.
  • At times, tarsal tunnel syndrome can appear without an obvious cause in some cases.

The Effects of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

  • Different sensations, an afflicted person may experience pain, tingling, burning or other unusual sensations in the foot of the affected leg.
  • The foot muscles, toes and ankle become weaker, and curling your toes or flexing your foot can become difficult.
  • If condition worsens, infections and ulcers may develop on the foot that is experiencing the syndrome.

A physical exam of the leg can help identify the presence of tarsal tunnel syndrome. Medical tests, such as a nerve biopsy, are also used to diagnose the condition. Patients may receive physical therapy and prescriptive medication. In extreme cases, some may require surgery.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Belleville and O'Fallon, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 13 September 2021 00:00

If left untreated, an ingrown toenail can lead to more serious concerns, such as an infection. Knowing proper nail care can help in the prevention of an ingrown toenail. Give us a call, and get treated!

Tuesday, 07 September 2021 00:00

Those with diabetes may find that their feet are more prone to dryness, itchiness, bruising, cuts, scrapes, and sores. These seemingly minor issues can be dangerous for diabetic feet. Even small wounds may heal slowly and poorly, becoming infected, or develop into diabetic foot ulcers (DFU's) over time. Topical medications are treatments that are applied directly to the skin to treat a skin problem. There are various topical medications that may be used to address skin conditions on diabetic feet. These include medications that moisturize the skin, protect the skin from irritants, reduce itchiness, decrease pain, disinfect wounds and aid wound healing. If you have DFU's or other skin problems on your feet a podiatrist can help to find the correct treatment for you. 

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with one of our podiatrists from Advanced Ankle & Foot Surgeons. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Belleville and O'Fallon, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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